EXCLUSIVE: The Roasterie gears up for its first drive-through

More than 20 years after opening, The Roasterie finally is building out its first drive-through location at 2663 Southwest Blvd.

The 2,000-square-foot space is down the street from The Roasterie’s factory/cafe location, giving customers a prime view of the underside of the company’s signature DC-3 aircraft, said Danny O’Neill, founder and owner of The Roasterie.

O’Neill had been mulling opening a drive-through location, but he had yet to find the ideal site. But in a serendipitous moment, O’Neill…

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Interior Design — Small Budget Kitchen Makeover

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Interior Design — Small Budget Kitchen Makeover
A 250-square-feet kitchen works extra hard for a young, busy family thanks to designer Olivia Botrie. See how she revamped the space while staying within budget using colored cabinets, smart storage, affordable finishes and more. Steal her tips for easy-to-achieve updates in your own kitchen!

Olivia wanted the kitchen to fit the family’s relaxed lifestyle, so she opted for durable materials. Working off a white palette, she painted the lower cabinets a dark blue to inject color while keeping the atmosphere light and bright. White cabinets pop against a chalkboard wall which displays kid’s artwork and schedules. Extra counter space and a full-height pantry with pullouts were added for additional storage. Olivia kept the base of the island, but swapped out the countertop with a larger marble slab to accommodate additional seating.
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The Story Behind The Classic Beauty Of Ginger Jars

Ginger jars are very appreciated by porcelain collectors who cherish them for their beautiful and intricate designs. But ginger jars weren’t always this popular, especially in Europe, and they weren’t always called ginger jars. They originated in China in the Qin Dynasty and they began being exported to Europe in the 19th century. That’s also…

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How to Make Mead at Home

How to Make Mead at Home
Watch the next episode: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/watch/ask-toh-walkway-mead-wiring

Ask This Old House host Kevin O’Connor learns about the centuries-old art of making mead.

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Time: A few hours of work, 1 year of aging

Cost: under $100

Tools:
Funnel

Shopping List:
Yeast
2x One-gallon jug
3 pounds of honey
Air lock cap
Marbles
Siphon tube
Home brewing sanitizer

Steps:
1. Before beginning the home brew process, ensure the gallon jug, funnel, and siphon tube have been properly sanitized.
2. Fill up the gallon jug about a third of the way up with either tap or bottled water (don’t use distilled water).
3. Add 3 pounds of honey, then cap the solution and mix it up by shaking the jug.
4. Heat up water to 104 degrees in a pan and add yeast to dissolve it.
5. While the yeast is dissolving, you can add optional yeast nutrients to get a cleaner ferment.
6. Once the yeast is dissolved, use a funnel to pour the yeast solution into the jug.
7. Pour more water into the jug and top it off until you reach the neck of the jug.
8. Place air lock cap on top of the jug and pour a little bit of water into it to form a seal. This will prevent oxygen from getting in but will allow carbon dioxide to escape.
9. After a several weeks, once carbon dioxide has stopped releasing from the jug and fermentation is complete, it’s time to siphon the solution into a new, clean jug.
10. Ensure the siphon tub and second jug have been properly sanitized, then place the older jug higher than the new jug. Fill the siphon tube with water and gravity will pull the mead from one jug to the next. Ensure you only siphon liquid, leaving behind any solids at the bottom of the jug.
11. To fill up the void left behind from one jug to the next and limit exposure to oxygen, place a number of sanitized marbles into the new jug.
12. Place the air lock on the new jug. Leave that on for about a month and then place a regular cap onto the jug once bubbles no longer appear.
13. Leave the solution in a dark spot, like the basement for about a year for the mead to age properly.

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How to Choose Wire Nuts for Your Projects

How to Choose Wire Nuts for Your Projects
Watch the full episode: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/watch/ask-toh-walkway-mead-wiring

Ask This Old House master electrician Scott Caron explains the differences between wire nuts size and color.

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Cost: $5 or less

Skill Level: Beginner

Tools:
Lineman’s Pliers

Shopping List:
Wire Nuts

Steps:
1. Scott explains the color and size of wire nuts are very important. Each color and size can handle a different amount of wires and gauge size.
2. Scott says the packaging on wire nuts typically shows which wire nuts work best which what gauge wires and the amount of connections it can handle.
3. Scott explains when wires were first spliced, they were soldered together like copper pipes in plumbing and covered with electrical tape. But the dangers were high for those type of connections.
4. Scott says the next type of connection was a copper coupling which covered the wires and bound them together. The coupling was then crimped to hold the splice firmly.
5. Scott shows Kevin how to splice two wires by lining up the insulation on both wires and twisting them together with lineman pliers. Once a solid connection is made, cut off the tip of the splice and cover it with a wire nut and ensure no copper is showing.

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How to Build a Bluestone Walkway

How to Build a Bluestone Walkway
Watch the full episode: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/watch/ask-toh-walkway-mead-wiring

Ask This Old House landscaping contractor Roger Cook helps a homeowner remove a flagstone walkway and replace it with bluestone.

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Time: 7-8 hours

Cost: Varies

Skill Level:
Difficult

Tools:
Gas Powered Plate Compacter
Rubber hammer
Wheelbarrow
Electric Jack hammer
Spade shovels

Shopping List:
Bluestone
¾-inch stone
Stone dust
Portland Cement
Mason’s Line
Stakes

Steps:
1. Start the process by removing the existing walkway with an electric powered jackhammer. Be sure to wear eye and ear protection.
2. Determine the width of the walkway (in this instance, referencing the the width of the front stairs). Spray paint marks six inches wider than the finished walkway to allow working space.
3. Excavate the area between the sprayed lines about 6 to 8 inches below grade.
4. Before backfilling, place a PVC pipe horizontally across the walkway using your height as a reference. This pipe can serve as a future chase for electrical or irrigation lines without disturbing the walkway.
5. Rake the surface smooth and then use a gas powered plate compacter to compact the subsoil.
6. Next, add a mix of stone dust and ¾-inch stone to a depth of 2-3” and run the plate compactor over that layer. Continually add the mix 2-3” at a time, compacting between layers, to ensure a solid base, until you are 3” from finished grade.
7. Set a mason’s line of 3 inches to match the height of the walkway and place it at a 90-degree angle to the front steps. To ensure the line is perpendicular, use the 3-4-5 method. Measure three feet horizontally and four feet vertically and the diagonal measurement in between the two points should be five feet if the lines are truly perpendicular.
8. To fill the uneven underside of the bluestone, use a 12:1 mix of stone dust and Portland cement and hammer the bluestone down on top of it, filling any voids. If the stone still rocks, you may need to add more mix and hammer again.
9. Once the stones are set and the stone surface is completely dry, spread polymeric sand into the joints, then carefully sweep or blow it off the stone surface. Wet the sand in the joints to lock the bluestone into place and minimize weeds and insects.

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